Are You a Moses or a Joshua? by Kelly Freestone

Kelly Freestone
Latest posts by Kelly Freestone (see all)

Introduction

When you are afraid of what’s to come, do you look at circumstances and your own inadequacy or do you look to God? Are you a Moses or a Joshua?

In this devotional we’re going learn what each of these men teach us about trusting God.

Moses

When God called Moses, he asked God question after question about his own human capabilities – as he watched a bush miraculously not being consumed by holy fire – and he questioned the validity of the call.

However, God tenderly, and lovingly, pointed Moses back to Himself each time. (Exodus 3)

Moses: Who am I?

God: I will be with you.

M: The Israelites don’t know me.

G: Tell them I AM has sent you.

M: They won’t believe me.

G: *Turns Moses’ staff into a snake and back, then his hand into a leaper’s hand and heals it.*

M: I’m not eloquent.

G: Who made your mouth?

You remember the story? Finally, God says that Moses can take Aaron to help him.

God essentially closed the door on anymore questions about the subject.

Now, picture a child who’s asking their parents “why” again for the millionth time from a string of answers already given.

The parent gets to a point where they are completely done with answering questions and says, “Because I said so.”

“We can’t do what God’s Spirit calls us to do in our own fleshly weakness. That’s why God points us back to Himself, just as He did with Moses.”

End of discussion. No more questions. Asking booth closed.

Moses kept looking at his own inabilities, his weakness, and saw that he couldn’t do it.

Are you and I looking at what we see with fear like Moses here? Are we looking at our own abilities and know we can’t do it?

Well, we’re right. We can’t. And neither could Moses.

We can’t do what God’s Spirit calls us to do in our own fleshly weakness.

That’s why God points us back to Himself, just as He did with Moses. That’s where trusting God begins.

Next, let’s see what we can learn from Joshua about trusting God.

Joshua

Joshua was one of two Israelites released from Egypt who entered the land promised by God. Why was this?

God told Moses to send one spy from each of the twelve tribes of Israel to scope out the Promised Land. (Numbers 13)

Joshua and Caleb were the only ones who trusted God when they first saw the enemy in the land of Canaan.

They were the only two out of twelve to trust God’s abilities and not cower in their own disbelief.“Joshua’s focus wasn’t on his own failing, broken, fleshly shortcomings, but on God’s sovereign abilities.”

Joshua had his eyes on God and knew God was in control and that they could not fail with His power and abilities sustaining them!

Joshua, unlike Moses, had his eyes glued to the One truly in charge and capable of delivering the Israelites to victory.

Joshua’s focus wasn’t on his own failing, broken, fleshly shortcomings, but on God’s sovereign abilities.

The fact that God said that He would give them the land was enough for Joshua to trust that it would be so.

Conclusion

So, what does this mean for us?

When we are afraid of what’s to come, we can take our eyes off the circumstances and problems we see and look to Jesus.

Just being quiet in His presence for a moment builds our faith in Him.

How?

  • Breathe and relax
  • Focus only on Him
  • Just be quiet, focused, and still in His presence

As a learning-to-Joshua Moses, I’m trying to turn “I can’t, it’s too much” into “When I rest in prayer, God will provide whatever is needed.”

Friend, unstick your clouded vision from what you know about your circumstances.

Instead, what have you been told? What has God asked you to do?

Don’t look at your own inabilities, weaknesses, or shortcomings. You won’t succeed by yourself.

Look at God’s faithful, sustained, unfailing abilities. He already has the plan and the outcome figured out!

To read more devotionals like this about looking to God, subscribe to our email list.

Did you know that we offer a suite of publishing services to meet the needs of Christian authors? Learn more.

Image Credit

Joshua Commanding the Sun to Stand Still upon Gibeon (1816) by John Martin, (painter) British, 1789 – 1854. The National Gallery of Art. 2004.64.1.

You already voted!
Related Posts

Stay Connected

Subscribe and Receive 1 Free eBook of Your Choice.